Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Supreme Court of Canada: New Library Titles

The list of new library titles added to the Supreme Court of Canada collection from January 1 to 15, 2017 is now available on the Court website.

It is possible to subscribe via e-mail to receive the list.

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Monday, January 16, 2017

Freshly Minted Profiles of Library and Information Studies Students and Grads

The website Librarianship.ca has been running a series of profiles called  Freshly Minted since 2013.

The series introduces Canadians who are studying for the Master's program in Library/Information Studies or who have recently graduated and are now working in the field.

The most recent instalment is about Lorisia MacLeod, a student at the School of Library and Information Studies, University of Alberta:
"Is there one aspect of the profession that surprises you that you were not expecting when you started the program? What is it?
I was pleasantly surprised about how accessible everyone in the field is to students. Before starting classes I contacted all of my professors to meet with them and every single one was willing to take time out of their busy day to meet with me. Even beyond that there was directors and managers that when I reached out were very happy to sit down and talk about their training and knowledge base. I guess I thought that as a student, important people wouldn’t have much time for me but I was pleasantly surprised with how supportive the field is of their students."

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Saturday, January 14, 2017

Senator Murray Sinclair's Residential School Reading List

Canadian Senator Murray Sinclair, the former Chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, has produced a Residential school reading list:
"Many of you have asked for a reading list on the topic of residential schools. Ask and ye shall receive. Here’s part of a larger reading list I use."

"There are several related topics of course which I recommend people take a look at such as Genocide, Colonization/Decolonization, Indigenous activism, child welfare and Indigenous children, Indigenous people and the Justice system etc. I also highly recommend all of Vine Deloria’s books, Thomas King’s Inconvenient Indian, Richard Wagamese’s book Indian Horse, all of the Research papers compiled by the Aboriginal Healing Foundation ... and the website of the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation ..."
In 2015, the Commission released its findings after its years-long investigation into the many abuses against Indigenous children at Church-run Indian Residential Schools in the 19th and 20th centuries.

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Thursday, January 12, 2017

Upcoming Ottawa Conference on the Charter and Emerging Issues in Constitutional Rights and Freedoms: From 1982 to 2032

The University of Ottawa is organizing a conference entitled Charter and Emerging Issues in Constitutional Rights and Freedoms: From 1982 to 2032 on March 8-10, 2017:
"Our conference will bring together leading constitutional scholars, as well as community leaders and policy makers to discuss and examine the possibilities and challenges for constitutional rights and freedoms over the next 10-15 years. The conference will begin on the evening of Wednesday, March 8, 2017 with a public debate on 'Resolved: The Charter Revolution is Over'. There will be a reception at the Supreme Court of Canada on the evening of Thursday, March 9, 2017."

"The Honourable Mr. Justice Richard Wagner of the Supreme Court of Canada will deliver a keynote address."
The conference is part of the Constitution 150 project, a year-long partnership of the Public Law Group at the University of Ottawa, the Centre for Constitutional Studies, the University of Alberta, and the Université de Montréal.

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Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Statistics Canada Article on Trends in Remand Over Past Decade

The Statistics Canada publication Juristat yesterday published an article entitled Trends in the use of remand in Canada, 2004/2005 to 2014/2015.

It looks at trends in the number of adults and youth being held in remand (pre-trial detention) in the period from 2004/2005 to 2014/2015.

Among the highlights:
  • In 2014/2015, on an average day, there were more adults in custody awaiting trial than there were convicted offenders serving time in sentenced custody. Provincial and territorial correctional facilities across the country supervised an average of 24,014 adults per day in sentenced custody and pre-trial detention; 13,650 of them, or 57%, were in pre-trial custody (remand).
  • In provincial and territorial correctional facilities, the average daily number of adults awaiting trial in remand has exceeded the number in sentenced custody since 2004/2005.
  • In comparison to ten years earlier, the number of adults in remand has grown almost six times more than the number in sentenced custody. From 2004/2005 to 2014/2015, the average daily adult remand population increased 39%, while the average daily sentenced custody population was up 7%.
  • All provinces and territories saw their adult remand numbers climb between 2004/2005 and 2014/2015. There have been particularly large increases in average daily counts in Nova Scotia (+192%), Northwest Territories (+139%), Manitoba (+134%) and Alberta (+109%).
  • One in four adults (25%) admitted to remand in 2014/2015 were Aboriginal persons (excluding Alberta and Prince Edward Island). This is about 8 times greater than the representation of Aboriginal persons in the overall population (3%).
  • Similar to the situation for adults, on an average day in 2014/2015, there were more youth aged 12 to 17 in pre-trial detention (561 or 56%) than were in sentenced custody (448 or 44%) (excluding Quebec). There have been, on average, more youth in pre-trial detention than sentenced custody since 2007/2008.
  • Unlike the findings for adults, the average number of youth in pre-trial detention has been declining, mirroring the notable drop in the number of youth charged with a crime in recent years.
  • In 2014/2015, more than one-third (36%) of youth admissions to pre-trial detention (in the eight jurisdictions where information was available) was an Aboriginal youth. This was about five times their representation in the general population (7%). In 2004/2005, Aboriginal youth accounted for 21% of admissions to pre-trial detention. In comparison to pre-trial detention, Aboriginal youth accounted for a larger share of admissions to sentenced custody in both 2004/2005 (26%) and 2014/2015 (40%).

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Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Call for Nominations for Denis Marshall Memorial Award for Excellence in Law Librarianship

The Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) is seeking nominations for the Denis Marshall Memorial Award for Excellence in Law Librarianship:
"This award is an honour bestowed upon a current member of CALL/ACBD who has provided outstanding service to the Association AND/OR enhanced the profession of law librarianship in the recent past. The specific contributions  must reflect the qualities embodied by Denis Marshall:
  • a continued commitment to excellence in law librarianship;
  • a strong service ethic;
  • a commitment to continuous learning;
  • a significant contribution to the scholarship of the library profession;
  • mentoring and encouraging those who seek a profession in law librarianship;
  • the pursuit of innovation and/or innovative solutions;
  • and/or a contribution to leadership in the law library profession. "
The name of the nominated person must be accompanied by two signed letters from colleagues in support of the nominee, with names and signatures of three additional CALL members supporting the nomination.

Nominations should be sent in by April 1, 2017.

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Monday, January 09, 2017

January 2017 Issue of Governance and Recordkeeping Around the World

The Governance and Recordkeeping Around the World newsletter, published by Library and Archives Canada (LAC), highlights issues pertaining to government and recordkeeping practices in the public and private sectors around the world.

The January 2017 issue has just been published.

It includes:
  • news items from Canada and around the world 
  • announcements of upcoming Canadian and international events (meetings, conferences, seminars) 
  • project and product news in areas such as digitization, archives, open source, e-government, access to information and Web 2.0 
  • listings of papers and readings (white papers, presentations, reports)

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Sunday, January 08, 2017

Library-Related Highlights from the Canadian Government's 2015-16 Departmental Performance Reports

Last month, the website Librarianship.ca published Highlights from the 2015-16 Departmental Performance Reports.

Every year, the President of the Treasury Board, a federal Cabinet minister, tables Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs) on behalf of dozens of federal government departments and agencies:
"Departmental Performance Reports are a measure of how well individual organizations met their plans and expected results as set out in their respective annual Reports on Plans and Priorities, including those for internal services."

"Below are some highlights of interest to the Canadian library and information management community as identified by individual departments and agencies."
The article includes excerpts from the DPR of the Supreme Court of Canada that covers IT risks (cyber attacks), electronic case management, the implementation of a new document management system by the Library and Information Management Branch and changes in the Court Records Centre.

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Thursday, January 05, 2017

January 2017 Issue of In Session - E-Newsletter of Canadian Association of Law Libraries


The January 2017 issue of In Session is available online.

It is the monthly e-newsletter of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) and contains news from CALL committees and special interest groups, member updates and events.

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Wednesday, January 04, 2017

Supreme Court of Canada: New Library Titles

The list of new library titles added to the Supreme Court of Canada collection in the month of December, 2016 is now available on the Court website.

It is possible to subscribe via e-mail to receive the list.

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Tuesday, January 03, 2017

Supreme Court of Canada Calendar of Upcoming Hearings

The Supreme Court of Canada has published its calendar of appeal hearings for January 2017.

To find out more about any particular case, the Court's website has a section that allows users to find docket information, case summaries as well as facta from the parties. All you need to do is click on a case name.

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Monday, January 02, 2017

Winners of 2016 Canadian Law Blog Awards

The winners of the 2016 Canadian Law Blog Awards (known as the Clawbies) were announced a few days ago.

The prize for Best Canadian Law Blog went to The Court, a blog covering the Supreme Court of Canada that is produced by faculty and students at Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto.

The Best Law Library Blog award went to Robeside Assistance maintained by the County of Carleton Law Association library in Ottawa. Library Boy was a runner-up in that category. Cool!

There were awards in many other categories.

The Clawbires are organized by Stem Legal, a B.C.-based strategy firm.

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Supreme Court of Canada 2016 Review

Ottawa-based Supreme Advocacy LLP recently published a Supreme Court of Canada 2016 Year-in-Review that provides a "complete legal snapshot of all the law from the SCC in 2016 (...) Each section is arranged in alphabetical order below by area of law so you can more easily find the decisions relevant to your practice."

Supreme Advocacy LLP specializes in agent services (production, technical review, servicing and filing) as well as involvement as counsel (drafting leave applications or factums, preparing oral argument, and providing strategic advice) in front of Canada's top court.



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Wednesday, December 14, 2016

Statistics Canada Article on Impaired Driving in Canada

The Statistics Canada publication Juristat has published an article entitled Impaired driving in Canada, 2015.

It presents data on police-reported impaired driving, including data specific to drug-impaired driving. It looks at the age and sex of accused persons and the time of day or time of year when those incidents occur.

Among the highlights:
  •  In 2015, police reported 72,039 impaired driving incidents, representing a rate of 201 incidents per 100,000 population. This is the lowest rate since data on impaired driving were first collected in 1986 (-65%) and 4% lower than in 2014.
  • Almost 3,000 drug-impaired driving incidents were reported, representing 4% of all impaired driving incidents, double the proportion in 2009, when data on drug-impaired driving became available. 
  • The majority of persons charged with impaired driving in 2015 were male. However, the proportion who were females has substantially increased over the past 30 years, from 8% in 1986 to 20% in 2015.
  • Young adults aged 20 to 24 years had the highest impaired driving rates. However, the largest declines in rates since 2009 were also observed among young drivers.
  • Almost half of impaired driving incidents reported by police in 2014 occurred between 11:00 p.m. and 4:00 a.m. This is also the time period which has shown the largest declines in recent years. Compared with alcohol-impaired driving, drug-impaired driving varies much less by day and time of day.
  •  Drug-impaired driving incidents were less likely to be cleared by charge than alcohol-impaired driving incidents. When heard by the courts, these cases also took longer to resolve and were less likely to result in a guilty finding.
  • At least 1 out of 6 persons accused in an impaired driving court case in 2014/2015 had been previously accused in another impaired driving case during the preceding 10 years.

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Tuesday, December 13, 2016

Library of Parliament Research Publication on Driverless Cars

The Library of Parliament recently released a research publication on driverless cars entitled Automated and Connected Vehicles: Status of the Technology and Key Policy Issues for Canadian Governments (dated September 2016):
"This document provides background information on automated and connected vehicles (AVs and CVs), and highlights some of the key policy issues related to their deployment. The first section defines AVs and CVs. The second section explains when these vehicles are expected to be deployed. The third section provides an overview of the potential benefits of this technology. Finally, the paper explains the federal government’s jurisdiction related to AVs and CVs and outlines some of the key policy challenges raised by the deployment of these vehicles."
The new technology raises issues relating to safety standards, the management of wireless spectrum, policing, and privacy concerns, among many others.

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Monday, December 12, 2016

Macdonald-Laurier Institute 2016 Review of the Supreme Court of Canada

The Macdonald-Laurier Institute, a public policy think tank based in Ottawa, recently released a report called The Supreme Court VS. Parliament Supreme Court of Canada 2016 Year in Review:
"The Supreme Court vs. Parliament emerged as the top theme of this third annual review of the Supreme Court of Canada’s major decisions. In a series of dissenting and concurring reasons, five of the nine judges on the Court voiced harsh criticism at various times of the majority judges for inappropriately intruding on Parliament’s policy-making role. This is a serious critique that goes to the heart of the relative responsibilities of the Court versus Parliament."

"Picking up where last year’s report left off, this report examines the legal significance and policy impact of the Supreme Court of Canada’s top-10 decisions from the last year (November 1, 2015 to October 31, 2016). These cases were selected based on the importance of their subject matter and broad significance to Canadians. While the start of the period covered by this report coincides with the commencement of the new Liberal government, decisions released during this period include litigation undertaken by both the former Conservative government as well as the new Liberal government."

"The main findings of this year’s study are:

1. A significant number of judges on the Supreme Court of Canada have been highly critical of their colleagues for intruding on Parliament’s policy-making role;
2. of the top-10 decisions in the last year, the federal government had zero wins, six losses, two mixed result outcomes, and two cases where it did not participate; and
3. major criminal justice reforms have been initiated by the Court to deal with significant concerns about delays and inefficiencies."
 It is the 3rd annual report on the country's top court written by University of British Columbia law professor Benjamin Perrin, Mr. Perrin once worked at the Court as a law clerk.

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